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SUMMER READING

Posted on 15 August 2016

1. Lolita

. by Vladimir Nakobov

Published in 1955, Lolita remains the most controversial novel of the century, the book tells the pernicious story of Dolores Haze, aka Lolita, and the unreliable narrator, Humbert Humbert's obsession with Lolita, his 12 year old step daughter.  

 

 

          

  

"Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta... She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita."

 

The stark juxtaposition of Lolita's melancholic tale in the novel against pop-cultures precociously flirty hallmark of femininity continues to inform our brand's aesthetic. Lolita appears as a  hyper-feminine coquettish archetype, yet possesses an undercurrent of darkness, which is often devoid in pop-cultural representations.

 

 

2. White Oleander

.By Janet Fitch

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The most intimate, lyrical and emotive coming of age story we've read yet, protagonist Astrid is left to grow-up in foster care, after her mother is arrested and charged with murder.

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“And in one drawer, twenty-seven names for tears. Heart dew. Grief honey. Sad water. Die Tranen. Eau de douleur. Los rios del corazon.”

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Astrid teaches us how to pick yourself up when the goings get tough and to always be ourselves, no matter how much others may try and influence us. 

 

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3. Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

by Haruki Murakami
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Creating a parallel universe between life and death, Murakami is best known for his surreal themes and plots. This read, published in 1985, was unlike anything we've seen before, transporting us to a intoxicating land of unicorns, dreams and glorious love. 

 

    

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“There is no 'why' in a world that would be perfect in itself.”

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4. M Train

By Patti Smith

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Based in New York City, Smith let's us take solace in her melancholic and solitary life, filled with black coffee, cats, and hours of thoughtfulness poured into her beloved diary. Traveling to the beach we visit her first home, we feel the wind in our hair and smell the decay of the old interior.

 

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“Not all dreams need to be realized. That was what Fred used to say. We accomplished things that no one would ever know.”

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We feel Smith's heartache for her husband, and wish for inspiration as she sits on her stoop, longing for love filled days gone by.

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5. The Bell Jar

By Sylvia Plath 

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American born poet and writer, semi-autobiographic novel, The Bell Jar, is one of her best known works. Originally published under pseudonym "Victoria Lucas" in 1963, the book tells the story of one woman's battle with mental illness, and a life of passion and self-destruction.  

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“I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart.

I am, I am, I am.” 

 

Plath took her own life just shortly after The Bell Jar was published.

 

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